Stone Repair

Don’t let anyone other than a stonemason repair your stonework

Builders tend to use cement rather than lime mortar which lets the stone breathe. Such repairs will not last long before they start to disintegrate and look terrible. But don’t worry, everything is fixable.

Stone restoration that lasts

When a stonemason repairs stonework he or she will try to keep as much of the original as possible (saving you money) and will carve replacement pieces to the architect’s original specification using limestone and sandstone sourced from the original quarries. The new pieces are then bonded to the original with lime mortar as opposed to cement. Only then do you get a result which is built to last and which complements your building. The whole process can take as little as a few weeks. For peace of mind and to discuss your project call Geraint on 07803 908066 for a free no obligation chat.

Some recent Stone Restoration projects

A Bay Window Restoration
Vale-Road-03

Recreating a brand new Victorian Bay

A Victorian Terrace Window
Cormont Road 06

Restoring original stone features in a Conservation Area

A Gothic Porch Restoration
Enfield-Porch-before-after

Restoring stone features on listed buildings

See more examples of my recent stone repairs and restoration work

Checking...

Ouch! There was a server error.
Retry »

Sending message...

Do you have a project you would like to discuss?

Please fill in the form below and I will be in touch soon

Attach a plan or photographs (Max 200kB per file)




Recent Posts

Testimonials

Geraint Davies was commissioned to design and carve a roundel to fill a vacant place above the main entrance porch to Saint James’s Church, Spanish Place. As a listed building of some merit and  one of particular interest in the Catholic history of London this was a sensitive task which Geraint executed with great patience and skill. I was impressed by the amount of time and care taken in preparing both the plans and the material for what has turned out to be a splendid addition to the visual impact of the church. Now that it is lit at night the roundel of the glorified Christ attracts much interest and is becoming a noteworthy (and sympathetic) part of the Marylebone architectural scene.
Father Christopher ColvenMarylebone, London