Victorian terrace window repair

Cormont Road 07

Have you ever commissioned a tradesman to repair something and it ends up worse than when they started? This happened to a delightful couple in Cormont Road, Camberwell; a fascinating purpose-built square of Victorian subtly-differing terraced houses. The stonework on the ground-floor bay had eroded and a cowboy builder had replaced the lower string with concrete paving slabs (!) and rendered over the moulding (see below).

Cormont Road before

Rendering over stone with a sand/cement mix is a temporary fix at best, due to the different thermal expansions of the materials. This had only been done 5 years previously. Luckily, David, the owner, had photos prior to this:

Cormont Road 04

From this I was able to work out the original mouldings. I ordered the stone and worked the individual stones to shape in my workshop, then after dismantling the stonework and 2 courses of bricks, we rebuilt the whole. This is near the end where we’ve installed the lower string course, laid the 2 brick courses and have pointed up the pediment. (That’s a ‘phonemason’, by the way…)

Cormont Road 05

Cormont Road 06

And this is the painted final.

Cormont Road 01

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Testimonials

Geraint Davies was commissioned to design and carve a roundel to fill a vacant place above the main entrance porch to Saint James’s Church, Spanish Place. As a listed building of some merit and  one of particular interest in the Catholic history of London this was a sensitive task which Geraint executed with great patience and skill. I was impressed by the amount of time and care taken in preparing both the plans and the material for what has turned out to be a splendid addition to the visual impact of the church. Now that it is lit at night the roundel of the glorified Christ attracts much interest and is becoming a noteworthy (and sympathetic) part of the Marylebone architectural scene.
Father Christopher ColvenMarylebone, London